August 23, 2014
Work in progress

Work in progress

August 10, 2014
'Hot Lips', acrylic and ink on antique map

'Hot Lips', acrylic and ink on antique map

August 9, 2014   4 notes
'And When I Dream I Dream About You', Belka the Soviet space dog, acrylic and ink on antique map

'And When I Dream I Dream About You', Belka the Soviet space dog, acrylic and ink on antique map

June 21, 2014
'Mutually Assured Destruction', acrylic and ink on antique map

'Mutually Assured Destruction', acrylic and ink on antique map

June 1, 2014
'Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You', acrylic and ink on antique map

'Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You', acrylic and ink on antique map

May 24, 2014   1 note
Artist’s Statement Number Two
Power wants what art has. 
These paintings talk of nationhood and power. Of the exercising and demonstrating of this power, through overt or tangential actions. Of making their mark on the landscape and consciousness, for the benefit of themselves and for the cognisance of others.
Icons of the cold war or national pride are overlayed on maps that represent a world long changed, shaped by the very ambitions that would eventually hurl living creatures into space or create ever more formidable fighting machines. 
References from popular culture and art are also present, as the global machinations of nation states are filtered and reflected in the music, film and art of the times, and sometimes used as weapons in the parallel cultural wars themselves.
The works themselves often follow or echo the contour lines, latitudes, longitudes and artificial boarders drawn upon the maps.
If all that sounds rather dull and worthy, I hope the presence of robots, monkeys, space dogs and fighter jets goes some way to meeting perhaps art’s primary aim - that it be visually appealing, whatever that may mean to you. 

Artist’s Statement Number Two

Power wants what art has. 

These paintings talk of nationhood and power. Of the exercising and demonstrating of this power, through overt or tangential actions. Of making their mark on the landscape and consciousness, for the benefit of themselves and for the cognisance of others.

Icons of the cold war or national pride are overlayed on maps that represent a world long changed, shaped by the very ambitions that would eventually hurl living creatures into space or create ever more formidable fighting machines. 

References from popular culture and art are also present, as the global machinations of nation states are filtered and reflected in the music, film and art of the times, and sometimes used as weapons in the parallel cultural wars themselves.

The works themselves often follow or echo the contour lines, latitudes, longitudes and artificial boarders drawn upon the maps.

If all that sounds rather dull and worthy, I hope the presence of robots, monkeys, space dogs and fighter jets goes some way to meeting perhaps art’s primary aim - that it be visually appealing, whatever that may mean to you. 

May 24, 2014   2 notes
Artist’s Statement Number One
My art is about pop music, pop culture, cold wars, hot wars, space races and arms races.
It’s about the beauty of the natural world and the cold utilitarian aesthetics of an assault rifle.
It’s about being bitten by a kitten.
It wants the one it can’t have.

Artist’s Statement Number One

My art is about pop music, pop culture, cold wars, hot wars, space races and arms races.

It’s about the beauty of the natural world and the cold utilitarian aesthetics of an assault rifle.

It’s about being bitten by a kitten.

It wants the one it can’t have.

May 4, 2014
Radio Moscow, acrylic and ink on antique map

Radio Moscow, acrylic and ink on antique map

April 26, 2014   1 note
'The Ambassadors', acrylic and ink on antique map

'The Ambassadors', acrylic and ink on antique map

April 13, 2014   8 notes
'The Great Dominions', acrylic and ink on antique map, 42x32cm

'The Great Dominions', acrylic and ink on antique map, 42x32cm